Monthly Archives: March 2016

Tips for Easy learning guitar chord

unduhan (11)There are a ton of guitar chords. Some can be very complicated and others are fairly easy. Some will make you stretch and coordinate your fingers and for others, you will need only one finger. Some chords will take a long time to master and others will take you just a few moments.

I will start you off with a few simple chords that can easily be used to play many songs. These are the chords I started with ten years ago when I first started playing guitar.

Tips for Getting Started

  • When you first start playing, your fingers may feel painful on the strings. As you practice, they will get calloused and tougher.
  • At first, your fingers also may not want to bend or stretch the way need to. This will also be helped with practice.
  • Don’t try to learn all the chords at once, or get frustrated if you can’t hit them quickly. Practice and determination are the keys to successfully mastering the guitar.
  • Record your practice sessions you can watch and listen to make sure you are doing it correctly. If you have one, use a webcam focused on your fret hand so you can watch your fingering.
  • Play each chord over and over until you are comfortable with it. Also try taking your hand off the chord and finding it again without looking. Do this several times until you can do it without looking at the guitar.
  • Practice strumming two or three chords at a time so you can get comfortable changing chords.

In this lesson, I will start you off with simple chords. As you progress, we will move on to more complicated chords.

G Chords

We will begin with the G chord. There are two ways to play this chord:

  • The easy way for people who cannot yet get their fingers to stretch all the way, including children, is the simple G.
  • The full G chord sounds better. You should strive to practice the full G, even if you can only play the simple G now.

Ways To Make A C Chord: The full G is played by moving your pinkie to the high E string, third fret, and moving your ring finger to the B string, third fret. Move your index finger to the A string, second fret, and your middle finger to the low E, third fret.

Me making a G chord on the guitar.
Simple G Chord

Now for the simple G chord. In order to play it, move your pinkie finger to the high E, third fret. Move your ring finger to the B string, third fret. These are the only fingers you will use for the simple G. See the photo below.

D Chord

Now, let’s learn the D chord.

Move your middle finger to the high E, second fret. Move your index finger to the G string, second fret. Move your ring finger to the B string, third fret. See photo below.

Me demonstrating the D chord on guitar.

Now practice changing between the G and D chords for guitar. At first, you will be slow and you may have problems with your fingers touching other strings and muffling the sound. When this happens, try and position your fingers properly so they are not touching other strings to develop muscle memory for the right position. This may take you a while to get used to.

Remember, practice and determination are the keys to playing these chords well.

C Chord

There are three ways to play this chord. The easy way for people who cannot yet get their fingers to stretch all the way, including children, is the simple C.

  1. For the simple C chord, put your index finger on the B string, first fret. That is it.
  2. The second way to play the C chord is by putting your pinkie on the high E string, third fret. Put your ring finger on the B string, third fret. Put your middle finger on the A string, third fret. Put your index finger on the D string, second fret.
  3. To play the full C chord, put your ring finger on the A string, third fret. Put your pointer finger on the B string, first fret. Put your middle finger on the D string, second fret.
  4. 3 Ways To Make A C Chord

There are a ton of guitar chords. Some can be very complicated and others are fairly easy. Some will make you stretch and coordinate your fingers and for others, you will need only one finger. Some chords will take a long time to master and others will take you just a few moments.

I will start you off with a few simple chords that can easily be used to play many songs. These are the chords I started with ten years ago when I first started playing guitar.

Tips for Getting Started

  • When you first start playing, your fingers may feel painful on the strings. As you practice, they will get calloused and tougher.
  • At first, your fingers also may not want to bend or stretch the way need to. This will also be helped with practice.
  • Don’t try to learn all the chords at once, or get frustrated if you can’t hit them quickly. Practice and determination are the keys to successfully mastering the guitar.
  • Record your practice sessions you can watch and listen to make sure you are doing it correctly. If you have one, use a webcam focused on your fret hand so you can watch your fingering.
  • Play each chord over and over until you are comfortable with it. Also try taking your hand off the chord and finding it again without looking. Do this several times until you can do it without looking at the guitar.
  • Practice strumming two or three chords at a time so you can get comfortable changing chords.

In this lesson, I will start you off with simple chords. As you progress, we will move on to more complicated chords.

G Chords

We will begin with the G chord. There are two ways to play this chord:

  • The easy way for people who cannot yet get their fingers to stretch all the way, including children, is the simple G.
  • The full G chord sounds better. You should strive to practice the full G, even if you can only play the simple G now.

Ways To Make A C Chord: The full G is played by moving your pinkie to the high E string, third fret, and moving your ring finger to the B string, third fret. Move your index finger to the A string, second fret, and your middle finger to the low E, third fret.

Me making a G chord on the guitar.
Simple G Chord

Now for the simple G chord. In order to play it, move your pinkie finger to the high E, third fret. Move your ring finger to the B string, third fret. These are the only fingers you will use for the simple G. See the photo below.

Simple G chord fingering.
D Chord

Now, let’s learn the D chord.

Move your middle finger to the high E, second fret. Move your index finger to the G string, second fret. Move your ring finger to the B string, third fret. See photo below.

Me demonstrating the D chord on guitar.

Now practice changing between the G and D chords for guitar. At first, you will be slow and you may have problems with your fingers touching other strings and muffling the sound. When this happens, try and position your fingers properly so they are not touching other strings to develop muscle memory for the right position. This may take you a while to get used to.

Remember, practice and determination are the keys to playing these chords well.

C Chord

There are three ways to play this chord. The easy way for people who cannot yet get their fingers to stretch all the way, including children, is the simple C.

  1. For the simple C chord, put your index finger on the B string, first fret. That is it.
  2. The second way to play the C chord is by putting your pinkie on the high E string, third fret. Put your ring finger on the B string, third fret. Put your middle finger on the A string, third fret. Put your index finger on the D string, second fret.
  3. To play the full C chord, put your ring finger on the A string, third fret. Put your pointer finger on the B string, first fret. Put your middle finger on the D string, second fret.
Ways To Make A C Chord
Simple C chord.
Full C chord.
Practice G, C, and D Chords

Now that you know three chords, practice your dexterity in switching between chords. See the video below.

E Minor Chord

To make the E minor chord, place your index finger on the A string, second fret. Place your middle finger on the D string, second fret. The photo for this is below.

E minor guitar chord.

Practice going back and forth between the different C and E minor chords. While the full C chord sounds best, you may find it easier to strum with one of the simplified chords.

F Chord

There is one F chord. To play it, put your index finger on both the B and high E strings together, first fret. Put your ring finger on the A string, third fret. Put your pinkie on the D string, third fret. Put your middle finger on the G string, second fret.

Simple C chord.
Second C chord.
Full C chord.
Practice G, C, and D Chords

Now that you know three chords, practice your dexterity in switching between chords. See the video below.

E Minor Chord

To make the E minor chord, place your index finger on the A string, second fret. Place your middle finger on the D string, second fret. The photo for this is below.

E minor guitar chord.

Practice going back and forth between the different C and E minor chords. While the full C chord sounds best, you may find it easier to strum with one of the simplified chords.

F Chord

There is one F chord. To play it, put your index finger on both the B and high E strings together, first fret. Put your ring finger on the A string, third fret. Put your pinkie on the D string, third fret. Put your middle finger on the G string, second fret.

How to play drum for beginner

1. Use a can of compressed air to get the dust out of those hard to reach places like in-between lugs and under the foot pedals of your drums.

2. Drum Teachers: Use flash cards as part of your drum lessons to help your students learn note values, dynamic markings, etc. You can make them yourself on 3 X 5 index cards.

3. Have a “Don’t Forget” list for all your instruments and related drum gear. Be sure to include such things as extra drum heads, drum sticks, mics and mic cables, metronome, duct tape, etc. This list will help you to never have one of those gut-wrenching moments when you realize you left something at home 2 hours away
4. Listen to “all” styles of music. This boosts your creativity on the drums and makes you more aware of how to approach these styles if you ever confront them in your band.

5. For dried up duct tape residue on your cymbals or drum stands, invest in a bottle of “Goo Gone”. This stuff is amazing (and even smells good!).

6. Teaching drums is an excellent motivator. You’ll learn a lot and your students will constantly keep you challenged during their lessons. When you’re able to articulate your point about any given subject, it’s then that you truly understand it. When you’re ready, consider offering drum lessons to beginner students. You’ll grow, learn, and get better at teaching. Good drum teachers are in demand!

7. Play “heel up” on the bass drum for more power and speed. The heel down bass drum technique will work but requires a bit more effort. Also, it’s easier to play heel up technique with quick drum fills

8. Books: There are many good drum method books that are not out in the limelight but are brilliantly written with top notch drum lessons. They may not be published through Warner Brothers or Hal Leonard, but the content is still top notch. Check out magazine reviews in drum publications, the web, etc. for independent book publishers.

9. Gaffers Tape: Ever hear people talk about “gaffers tape” and wonder what they’re referring to? Although it is similar to duct tape, gaffers tape leaves no residue on your drums, is a bit thicker and easier to tear. It’s also considerably more expensive.

10. The Library: Don’t forget your local Library as a rich resource of information about drums, drumset, and overall drumming and percussion (CDs, reference books, music history, etc.).

11. Soundproofing: To truly soundproof a drum room, you must create air channels between wall layering. We will be describing this in more detail later.

12. Warming up before a gig. This is terribly underestimated. Spend 20 to 30 minutes warming up withdrum rudiments and related sticking exercises. Practice them with music playing through a Walkman. It’s a great motivator and you’ll be very loose when you get ready to play.

13. Drum Set 101: It’s a bit of a misconception that you always need a drumset to work out drum licks or patterns. One can still have an effective practice by playing in the air (air drums) and/or tapping on their legs. The main idea is to go through the motions so you form some amount of muscle memory.