Category Archives: Music

Do you know that music is good thing for your health ?

Music is the part of art that favored by many people. From old, young, child, men, and woman are like music. Music has many genres that all of them is easy to listening. If you need music service. Then street pianos is the best solution for you. It always ready to help you. It provide the best music for you. The development of the music also give affect to the music genre. The music is very close with human daily life. Listening music is pleasure, some type of music also can make people feel calm. Music can greatly affect to human emotions. By the research, music is really can change the humans mood, although of that it can also increase the concentration. Not only that but also can reduce stress. Listening the music can give a real effects to the all part of brain that responsibility for some aspect, like memories and visuals. There are some healthy benefit of listen music. The first benefit, reducing stress. By the research some people are listening the music to encourage while working. Other people listen the music on the way to work to coping the stress. The second, increase the body endurance. Listen some types of music can make people run faster. It is because music can helping increase the endurance by 15 percent. The third, improve the ability of verbal and visual. Music for children can stimulate children’s brain and increase the intelligent of verbal ability. Music can also increase children IQ. An adult that regularly listen music can keep the brain still healthy when the age added. All activity that using music can improve the brain be work better. The last benefit, reducing blood pressure. Listening some slow music regularly at morning and night can lower the blood pressure by the people who have high blood pressure. There are some healthy benefit of music.

The success secret to play drum

unduhan (10)I’ve been teaching online drum lessons over the past 10 years, and I’ve always been adamant that I will answer my own emails. To this day, that is still the same (I’m not lying, try me: jared@drumeo.com). I love connecting with my online students and helping their drumming in any way I can. I’ve manually responded to tens of thousands of messages from my online students and there always seems to be common themes that come up.

The biggest theme I’ve noticed is that most people don’t know how to practice. I’m not sure why students are having problems with this, but I definitely want to find ways I can help. Part of me thinks that I am partially responsible. With Drumeo, we provide so much information, it’s likely people don’t even know where to start. If you started watching Drumeo lessons today it would take you more than 100 days to complete all the videos if you watched 24 hours a day. (I don’t recommend this haha!)

This massive amount of information can be deceiving because students think they have to watch it all. But that’s not the reason we have so many different lessons. The reason we have so many different lessons is because there are so many different drummers who all want to learn something different. We want to help everyone!

So in this article, I want to share with you my five tips for practicing the drums and cutting through the information overload:

1) Always Go Into A Practice Routine With A Plan

I have known this for years, but it was re-enforced recently when I attended one ofBenny Greb’s Master Sessions. I think Benny is an amazing drummer, but that didn’t just come to him without hard practice. I actually think he’s just damn good at practicing and being super efficient with his time, which turned him into an incredible drummer.

So before you sit down at your drums, plan out exactly what you are going to do. If you want to just play around for a bit, then at least plan that (not what you’re going to do, but the fact that you’re just going to experiment for awhile).

The point of this isn’t to make your practice routine ultra rigid, and you can still be spontaneous if you’re feeling inspired, but you need to be more intentional with what you want to accomplish with your time spent behind the kit.

2) Get Your Lesson Plan From A Professional Teacher

This isn’t some hidden pitch for Drumeo. Obviously I think Drumeo is amazing, that’s why I work my ass off every day to make the best drum lessons in the world. You can get your lesson plan from anyone who is qualified. Go get a private lesson with a local instructor, take a Skype lesson with a drummer online, or maybe you could even get some Drumeo lessons. (Hint: you can also get a free t-shirt and drumsticks when you sign up right now!)

3) Have A Balance Of Technique And Musicality

I go through phases where I become obsessed with certain things. Like when I practiced finger technique non-stop for years, or sat in a room slowly practicing the Moeller motions for days and days. I would literally not hang out with my friends so I could stay at home and practice my rudiments. I know, I know, a bit boring but I am happy I did it – well, most of it.

One big mistake I made, and still sometimes make to this day, is that I don’t balance my practice enough between technique and musicality. What point is having good technique if you have nowhere to apply it? So for me, I need to be very intentional about playing music and becoming a better musician.

Practicing technique won’t make you a better musician. Playing music will make you a better musician. Technique is easy and fun to practice because it’s quantifiable, but it’s not the end all be all with drumming. No musical director cares how fast you can play, or how good your medium full stroke roll is. So try to balance your practice between technique and musicality. (if you need more help with this just email me: jared@drumeo.com)

4) Publicly Commit To Something Hard To Do

Tell your friends, wife, brother, sister, band-mates, dry cleaners, pastor, and whoever else you can think of that you are going to do something. Ask them to hold you accountable if you want. I did this once, and I had to learn the hardest thing I’ve ever learned. (it was a Virgil Donati exercises where he plays a single paradiddle between his right hand and right foot, then a double paradiddle between his left hand and left foot).

It was crazy hard, but I’m glad I did it. You don’t have to choose something as hard as I did, but it’s really motivating to pick something and go for it. Not only is it motivating for you, but you’ll be surprised that it might give someone else a kick in the butt to be more productive!

5) Practice Drums Every Day

Of all the tips, this is the most important (maybe that means it should be number one, but oh well, let’s leave it at number five so only the hardcore Drumeos who read the whole article get the best tip!)

Whether you are active listening to music, tapping on your legs, or just playing on the practice pad – do something every day. Even if it’s just 10 minutes each time, it’s better than nothing.

There are no excuses for not practicing. Don’t get into the mind-set that the ‘stars have to be aligned’ for you to practice on the kit. Just do something.

Tips for good at violin for beginners

I wonder if this ethereal quality of music is why musicians-spend-a disproportionate amount of time practising compared with actual performing for live audiences. In a way, like dancers and actors, we are the product.Yes, we study and train for our art, but more-than-anything else, we just practise. Love it or not, the not-so-gentle Art of Practice is a significant part of musicians’ expertise and life.

1. Slow Practice or Fast Practice

Every musician knows the necessity and value of practising slowly, learning to perfect a piece at an achievable speed. Making the connection with the music at the normal tempo is not as simple. It requires a different kind of practice: fast playing is not just slow playing speeded up. Performing a passage quickly requires additional skills, such as finger preparation, economy of motion, thinking ahead and learning some new ways of playing. Many techniques take on different qualities at speed. Certain types of staccato bowstrokes, for example, must be executed with the rapid springing of the bow rather than deliberate finger pinches originating at the bowhold.

Posture, bowhold and left hand skills that appear adequate for slow playing may not work well for quick playing. Stiffness in the elbow or fingers and excessive movement of the bow arm hampers fast bowstrokes and string crossings. Habitually raising fingers too high above the fingerboard limits the speed with which they can be accurately placed and causes poor coordination with the bow.

2. Only Work on What Needs Improving

A little story… In the early days I was perplexed by the unusual progress of two of our young students. Despite learning new pieces quickly and keeping up all of the preceding pieces, their playing style and technique constantly lagged behind. Each week at lessons I  had to go over one of the fundamental techniques with them again – often the identical one. Correcting the same problems over and over is discouraging for everyone. I couldn’t work it out: their lovely dedicated parents, well-educated professionals, worked conscientiously with them every day at home. No matter how carefully and thoroughly we went over the point with the mothers and students in the lesson, things didn’t really get better in proportion to the practice they were doing.

Eventually through trial and error, we discovered a solution. Notwithstanding the consternation of their parents, I resolved to feature both students as soloists in a concert later in the year. So each week after the group class several of our teachers and I conducted a rehearsal-masterclass for them and other students. In this friendly public setting we identified a specific point for each performer to practice during the week. Over several months, the combination of focused attention and the irresistible power of social proof – watching other students improving – had the desired effect. Their solos at the concert were delightful!

Children naturally enjoy practising the music they already know and play well. It’s the means by which we learn musicality, freeing the attention to focus on expression alone. New skills are a different matter. Finding and working on challenging parts is the pathway to real progress in technique. I joke with my students that good musicians are happiest when they discover the really difficult passages. And it’s true. As frustrating as these parts can be, they are the cutting edge of our skills and abilities, providing a clear vision of what needs to improve in our playing.

I teach parents and students to identify and isolate the part that needs improving as precisely as possible. Is it difficult because of an awkward shift, a tricky string crossing, a speed problem, troublesome intonation or a particular bow technique? Correctly solving these problems makes students better players and fixes future pieces.

3. Practise with Recordings

Unless you can go to live concerts regularly, recorded performances of the great players provide us with golden models for study. On a good audio system you can listen again and again to great interpretations from the world’s top musicians of the music you are studying, a feat that was impossible just a few generations ago. Suzuki took this a step further by teaching students to play along with these recordings, absorbing the styles, phrasing and tempos of professionals, much in the same way as Leonardo da Vinci’s apprentices absorbed his painting styles and techniques by imitating and replicating his masterpieces.

When done correctly and consistently, this daily practice habit produces the fluent ability to perform securely and confidently – without stumbles.

4. Set Time Goals for Your Practice Sessions

I often hear this advice: “the quality of practice is more important the quantity.It’s true, of course. Half an hour of good concentrated practice is more valuable than an hour of sawing mindlessly away without a clear purpose. Nevertheless the reality is that we can fool ourselves into thinking that our short sessions are sufficient because we practised the important things. I’ve done it myself – all too often.

The quantity of practice is important too. The first hour is essentially warming up – maintenance. In the second hour you can start to make progress, and after another hour or two there comes a point when you feel like you can play almost anything. The strings begin to feel silky smooth, the bow moves freely and you become able to create subtle and minute differences in pitch, shape, colour and rhythm.

The important tips when playing violin

images (20)So what are the fundamental hallmarks of proper violin practice, and how can you use your practice time productively? In this article we’d like to shed some light in this area and take you through a few tips that are important for beginners to understand for improvement.

1. Private Violin Lessons

When learning to play the violin, the best place to start is by signing up for one-on-one violin lessons. Choosing a teacher is no easy task, but a few things to consider are the teacher’s:

  • Understanding of the violin’s mechanics

  • Knowledge of universal music and repertoire

  • Personal playing skills

  • Communication strength

Above all these characteristics, the most important thing to consider is the teacher’s understanding of the learning process – it must correlate with where you are as a student and your ability to learn. Naturally, private lessons are valued for their personal developmental qualities and progress, especially when it comes to younger students.

2. When and Where you Practice

Ideally, practicing the violin should be done in your personal “prime time,” when you feel most fresh and focused. For some this might be first thing in the morning; for others maybe it’s in the evening, right after school or work. Try following a routine that accommodates your natural energy peaks or dips. If, for example, you feel drained during a long practice session, try splitting your practicing into two shorter sessions. Whatever the case, make sure that you’re practicing consistently. Also, keep your environment –where you’re playing – in mind, as well. Make sure you’re in a quiet space that allows for minimal interruptions.

3. Practice Accessories

Take a few moments to gather all the materials you may need before starting your practice session. This doesn’t just mean your music and violin – you may also want to set up your stand according to your preferred position (sitting vs. standing), as well as sharp pencil to mark tricky passages and fingerings. If you prefer to play the violin while seated, use a chair with sufficient support to assist your posture – slouching only leads to poor violin tone!

4. Practice Length

When it comes to your violin practice sessions, it’s less about how long you’re practicing for and more about what you’re achieving in each session. Sure, repetition of exercises can be helpful, but be careful that it doesn’t become mindless! Mindless practice can lead to the reinforcement of mistakes. Keep your practice sessions at a length that you can maintain concentration at – this way, quality will trump quantity, and that’s what your aim should be.

5. Get Limber

Improved violin playing, solid practice sessions, and core disciplines all work together. While warming up with exercises or scales and trills can begin to feel like a chore after a while, they’re crucial to strengthening your fingers before any proper playing can begin. Practice holding your bow before even picking up your violin – and when you do start practicing, ensure that you relax your bow hand in between exercises by vigorously shaking out tension without the bow in your hand.

6. Practice More Scales

You have two options when learning a new scale: academic or physical. The academic approach relies on you being comfortable with looking at the music, learning the signature key, and then figuring out the relative minor and major keys. The physical approach can be a little more exciting – it relates to feeling the occurring tones and semitones by observing the spaces between fingers. Either way, you should practice all scales slowly and in detail until there is no clumsiness.

Many people tend to rush through areas of difficulty; instead, learn how to play a challenging scale or piece slowly until you get it right, and then speed it up. Another tip is to try practicing scales in front of a mirror – this will help you simultaneously develop a few other techniques, like the correct arm positioning during shifts or wrist flexibility.

Professional at drum

Both Benny and Thomas possess the enviable ability to turn their hands and feet to a huge range of musical styles, from jazz and fusion to rock and pop and make it all look so easy in the process. So, when Rhythm got face-to-face with these two masters of the kit, they wanted to find out the secrets of their technique and get some handy tips and tricks that you can apply to your drumming.

Tip 1: Set up correctly

What’s the most common mistake people make when setting up their drums?

Thomas: “To set the drums up for the viewer so it looks cool from the front rather than for yourself. I know a lot of young drummers make that mistake. Number two would be to set the drums up so that the bass drum is facing the audience straight on, rather than being off to the right if you are a right-handed drummer, because the bass drum is not the centre of the drumset.

“We, as drummers, often make the mistake of thinking pattern-oriented, which means we focus on what we do instead of how we do it.” Benny Greb

“Number three is to try to make the drumset perfectly symmetrical. Another is to sit too low or too high, or to set up the cymbals too far away from the player so you have to play with your arm completely stretched – I see that a lot.

“Whatever you do with your body mechanically has to be within a spherical space. It’s not a straight plane, you are moving within a spherical space and your set-up has to reflect that, so whatever is higher on the drumset has to be closer to you.”

Benny: “I would say it’s that they don’t really set it up, bit by bit, in relation to how they sit and to their body, but they set up their kit then sit behind it and see whether it feels right.”

Now try this: kit set-up

Benny: “What creates great results is to take your stool, adjust it so it is cool for you, which normally means there is more than a 90° angle between your legs and your spine and between your upper legs and lower legs. Then you set up the snare drum so it is comfortable, then a bass drum where the foot really sits, then a hi-hat where the foot really sits, and so on.

“If you let students do this, it really results in a very natural set-up.”

Benny, you play matched grip. Do you prefer a French timpani grip or a German grip?

Benny: “Being patriotic I like the German grip! I think there is this conspiracy on the internet where someone always pays some people to say that this or this is the best grip and blah blah blah. The thing is that you can’t do everything with one grip, it’s not possible, so you need these different grips to do different things. You can’t do any accents with finger technique, you need the wrist, you need the Moeller technique.

“I think I am generally in a more German position but it’s a little weird with me – it’s not out of the teaching rulebook, what I do. My right hand tends to be more French and my left hand tends to be more German grip. It’s not very symmetrical.”

Thomas, you’ve played with both matched and traditional grips. What would you say are their comparative strengths?

Thomas: “I think the strength of traditional is that it’s an asymmetrical grip and it affects the way you think. The asymmetry of the grip lends itself to asymmetrical thinking and therefore playing, a bit like playing the guitar where the left hand is on the fretboard and doing something completely independent from the right hand which is strumming, but together the two hands produce one sound.

“I look at playing traditional grip the same way where the two hands use two completely different techniques – one hand from underneath the stick, the right hand from on top so there is a push-pull dynamic in your upper body.

“Matched grip is more modern, it’s more powerful, it’s more balanced. You have better reach with matched grip. It causes fewer injuries. Traditional grip causes a lot of bruises, abrasions, chafing, all sorts of issues. Of course you get blisters with both grips but less surface and skin injuries with matched grip. It lends itself to a more ambidextrous style with open-handed playing, which would be awkward using traditional grip.”

“Rule number one: for speed you must compromise volume. There is no other way, you can’t play ultra-fast and ultra-loud at the same time.” Thomas Lang

What’s the one piece of advice you would give someone looking to improve their playing with their hands?

Benny: “Have a catalogue of parameters that you go through focussing on while you’re playing and adjust your technique according to that list. Some people say it’s boring to play a paradiddle every day for an hour and they are totally right. It’s absolutely boring to play a paradiddle but it’s not boring if you listen to the sound that it makes and try to get it consistent.

“If you take time for one of these parameters, just the sound, does it sound the same? Do you have to play on the same spot? Do you find it hard to play on the same spot? How does it sound if you don’t play on the same spot? Is that a different sound that you want to cultivate, to have in your repertoire? Do you always make rim shots when you try to accent? Can you accent without doing rim shots, focussing on dynamics only?

Tips for great play in drum

Pratice tips

Being a drummer is more than just a hobby; it is a lifestyle – one that takes a lot of commitment and diligence to succeed at. The payout; however, is immense. Being a drummer can be one of the most fulfilling things someone can do in their life. But how do you get to that level of musicianship? There is definitely a difference between a drummer who plays for a hobby, and a drummer who plays for a lifestyle. The big difference is attitude and practice habits. Having the self control and commitment to practice regularly is the only way you will improve as a drummer. There are a few tips that I have developed over the years of drumming that will help any drummer out immensely; tips that will speed up your learning curve and make practicing the drums a fun experience and not a chore. So read on to learn a few common practice tips developed to enhance your drumming.

Make Time to Practice and Time to Play

One of the biggest errors a drummer can make is failing to make time for practice as well as time to jam. Believe it or not, there is a big difference here. Practice time is a chance to work on your stick control, drumming beats, skills, and other techniques that you may want to learn. Jam time is a chance to apply your newly learned skills to real applications. Most drummers allot a time to “practice / jam” and end up just playing to a few of their favorite bands. Now this is not a bad thing; however you never really get that focused practice time alone. So, my first tip is to schedule a time in your week to practice, and a time to jam. This way you can sit down and focus on developing your independence, speed, and control of your feet and sticks without getting distracted. For some great ideas on practicing the drums, check out the play-along section of FreeDrumLessons.com; there you will find tons of songs that you can download and take to your kit!

Use a Practice Pad

This is an obvious tip for drum practicing; however it goes a little deeper than that. When you practice, you should spend half of your time practicing on the full drum set. And the other half of the time on a practice pad. This is something that most drummers know to do, but rarely do it. The benefit to using a practice pad is you are forced to develop your stick control. When you play on a full drum set, you have a lot of distractions in front of you, making it easy to play around the kit instead of focusing on one technique. A pair of sticks, a metronome, and a practice pad is all you need to improve your speed, control and creativity on the drums. Not sure what to practice on a practice pad? Check out thedrum rudiments section where you can practice your single stroke roll, double stroke roll, paradiddleand more!

Use a Pillow for a Practice Pad

Following the practice pad tip is a small little tip that most drummers do not know about – using a pillow for a practice pad. Most drummers would never do this because there is little to no bounce from a pillow, it practically absorbs your full stroke; very inefficient. This is the whole point of using a pillow though, to force yourself to work that much more. When you get no bounce from the pad or drum, you are forced to use your wrists to bring the sticks back up. This really works your wrists out. Try playing a double stroke roll on a pillow, not as easy as you think!

Practice with a Metronome

This is another one of those obvious tips for practicing; however I cannot stress it enough! Practicing without a metronome can actually hinder your drumming, as you may learn how to play a drum fill or solo off time! We are drummers; our duty is to keep the band on time. If we cannot even play a solid drum beat or roll on time, then how are we supposed to lead a band? There are ways to add some creativity to this tip though, and that is by playing to your favorite band tracks. Most tunes recorded professionally are on time, so you can always play along to them instead of a click track. This way practice is a little less boring, being able to listen to your favorite songs while you practice. Just make sure you do not break tip number one and get distracted by the song!

Set a Goal for Each Practice Session

One tip most drummers fail to do is set goals for their practice sessions. This does not have to be an unreasonable goal, just a very basic reachable goal. Make it challenging and sensible at the same time. The reason for this is you are more focused on the time you are practicing. If you go into a practice session with no goals, then you will have no drive to learn anything! A very common goal I like to set is tempos in which I play my essential drum rudiments at. For example, I may set a goal to play a double stroke roll at 180 bpm one session, and 185 bpm the next. So as you can see, this is just to give yourself some guidelines for your time spent practicing.

Surround Yourself in Challenging Music

A really important tip I will share is to surround yourself in challenging music and drumming. If you want to learn how to play the double bass drum, then surround yourself in music that incorporates thedouble bass drum. The same goes for all styles of music; you will not learn jazz by listening to rock. When you are constantly listening to advanced beats and odd time signatures, you are sub-consciously implementing it into your brain. You will be challenged much more, and have a much greater creative edge this way. So try and find some music that challenges you a little.

Have Fun No Matter What

The last tip is another given – have fun no matter what you are playing. This means even if you are practicing boring rudiments, try and find a way to make it fun. If you are not having fun when you are playing, then you will not learn nearly as much. So play what you want to play, and practice what you want to practice! Drumming is supposed to be a way to express yourself in a good and positive way, so make sure you are having fun!

These tips are more like guidelines that every drummer should take into consideration when practicing. You will notice when you start following these guidelines, you will get much more out of your practice sessions! Once you are ready to start practicing, feel free to check out the beginners section of this site for great lessons on playing the drum!

Tips to great play at violin

As much as every budding violinist would love to pick up their instrument and begin playing beautiful music, the work required to get there is much more mundane – every breathtaking performance requires strategic and focused warm up exercises beforehand. These routines help you develop and maintain your basic violin skills as well as gear up for more advanced techniques, too.

For beginners, it may be difficult to know even where to start; after all, everything seems to need work. However, using the beginning of each practice session for a warm up will optimize each day’s result and pave the way for strong playing for months and years to come.

Although warm up exercises will vary from person to person based on the advice of yourviolin teacher, there are certain exercises that can benefit everyone. Here are five beginner violin tips that will help you grasp the fundamentals:

  1. Long open strings. Playing long open strings does several things: it lets you practice consistent intonation with each stroke, it allows you to become familiar with your bow’s weight and speed across the strings, and lastly, it helps ensure that your bow remains in the proper location on the strings in relation to the bridge. Look into a mirror and place the bow on the string in the proper point and pull the bow across the string, listening for a clear, clean, and consistent note. As you play, continually check in the mirror for your bow’s contact point. Repeat at least five up and down bows before moving on to the next string.

  2. Finger placement. Correct finger placement is essential for playing the right notes on the violin, and to learn this correctly, you must practice! One of the tried and truebeginner violin tips is to play simple scales in first position. This trains your fingers to understand where they belong on the fingerboard in relation to the other fingers, and it trains your ear to hear each note as it should be played. To practice, pick any scale, and play each note slowly, separately, and precisely. Always play with a tuner so that you can tweak your finger placement for proper intonation.

  3. Fourth finger practice. Placing your fourth finger on a string creates the same note as the subsequent higher open string. Some beginner violinists use the open string to play the note because it is much easier and you know that the note will be correct. However, as you advance, there will be times where you cannot access the open string to play the note, or it is much less efficient to do so. Therefore, you need to strengthen your pinky finger! Start by playing the open string, then mimic that note using your pinky on the lower string about five times for each string. Listen carefully – does the fourth finger note match that of the open string? Don’t get discouraged if it’s difficult to even stretch your pinky at first – it will take time for it to gain strength and flexibility.

  4. Slurs. A slur allows you to play two or more notes in a single bow stroke. To do this, start by placing the end of your bow close to the frog on the string. As you slowly but steadily bring your bow across the strings, place and then remove your first finger in the proper place while keeping your bow straight. Also make sure that you place your finger on and off the strings at regular intervals – using a metronome will help you. Start with two notes per bow stroke.

  5. String crossing. The final of the beginner violin tips is the ability to make a clean change from string to string while playing. Keep your elbow at a right angle to form a square  – include the bow and trace an imaginary line from your shoulder to where the bow hair touches the string. Rock the bow to each string while practicing your long bow strokes. Make sure that your arm and bow remain in the same plane, and use the natural weight of your arm on each string.

Tips for Easy learning guitar chord

unduhan (11)There are a ton of guitar chords. Some can be very complicated and others are fairly easy. Some will make you stretch and coordinate your fingers and for others, you will need only one finger. Some chords will take a long time to master and others will take you just a few moments.

I will start you off with a few simple chords that can easily be used to play many songs. These are the chords I started with ten years ago when I first started playing guitar.

Tips for Getting Started

  • When you first start playing, your fingers may feel painful on the strings. As you practice, they will get calloused and tougher.
  • At first, your fingers also may not want to bend or stretch the way need to. This will also be helped with practice.
  • Don’t try to learn all the chords at once, or get frustrated if you can’t hit them quickly. Practice and determination are the keys to successfully mastering the guitar.
  • Record your practice sessions you can watch and listen to make sure you are doing it correctly. If you have one, use a webcam focused on your fret hand so you can watch your fingering.
  • Play each chord over and over until you are comfortable with it. Also try taking your hand off the chord and finding it again without looking. Do this several times until you can do it without looking at the guitar.
  • Practice strumming two or three chords at a time so you can get comfortable changing chords.

In this lesson, I will start you off with simple chords. As you progress, we will move on to more complicated chords.

G Chords

We will begin with the G chord. There are two ways to play this chord:

  • The easy way for people who cannot yet get their fingers to stretch all the way, including children, is the simple G.
  • The full G chord sounds better. You should strive to practice the full G, even if you can only play the simple G now.

Ways To Make A C Chord: The full G is played by moving your pinkie to the high E string, third fret, and moving your ring finger to the B string, third fret. Move your index finger to the A string, second fret, and your middle finger to the low E, third fret.

Me making a G chord on the guitar.
Simple G Chord

Now for the simple G chord. In order to play it, move your pinkie finger to the high E, third fret. Move your ring finger to the B string, third fret. These are the only fingers you will use for the simple G. See the photo below.

D Chord

Now, let’s learn the D chord.

Move your middle finger to the high E, second fret. Move your index finger to the G string, second fret. Move your ring finger to the B string, third fret. See photo below.

Me demonstrating the D chord on guitar.

Now practice changing between the G and D chords for guitar. At first, you will be slow and you may have problems with your fingers touching other strings and muffling the sound. When this happens, try and position your fingers properly so they are not touching other strings to develop muscle memory for the right position. This may take you a while to get used to.

Remember, practice and determination are the keys to playing these chords well.

C Chord

There are three ways to play this chord. The easy way for people who cannot yet get their fingers to stretch all the way, including children, is the simple C.

  1. For the simple C chord, put your index finger on the B string, first fret. That is it.
  2. The second way to play the C chord is by putting your pinkie on the high E string, third fret. Put your ring finger on the B string, third fret. Put your middle finger on the A string, third fret. Put your index finger on the D string, second fret.
  3. To play the full C chord, put your ring finger on the A string, third fret. Put your pointer finger on the B string, first fret. Put your middle finger on the D string, second fret.
  4. 3 Ways To Make A C Chord

There are a ton of guitar chords. Some can be very complicated and others are fairly easy. Some will make you stretch and coordinate your fingers and for others, you will need only one finger. Some chords will take a long time to master and others will take you just a few moments.

I will start you off with a few simple chords that can easily be used to play many songs. These are the chords I started with ten years ago when I first started playing guitar.

Tips for Getting Started

  • When you first start playing, your fingers may feel painful on the strings. As you practice, they will get calloused and tougher.
  • At first, your fingers also may not want to bend or stretch the way need to. This will also be helped with practice.
  • Don’t try to learn all the chords at once, or get frustrated if you can’t hit them quickly. Practice and determination are the keys to successfully mastering the guitar.
  • Record your practice sessions you can watch and listen to make sure you are doing it correctly. If you have one, use a webcam focused on your fret hand so you can watch your fingering.
  • Play each chord over and over until you are comfortable with it. Also try taking your hand off the chord and finding it again without looking. Do this several times until you can do it without looking at the guitar.
  • Practice strumming two or three chords at a time so you can get comfortable changing chords.

In this lesson, I will start you off with simple chords. As you progress, we will move on to more complicated chords.

G Chords

We will begin with the G chord. There are two ways to play this chord:

  • The easy way for people who cannot yet get their fingers to stretch all the way, including children, is the simple G.
  • The full G chord sounds better. You should strive to practice the full G, even if you can only play the simple G now.

Ways To Make A C Chord: The full G is played by moving your pinkie to the high E string, third fret, and moving your ring finger to the B string, third fret. Move your index finger to the A string, second fret, and your middle finger to the low E, third fret.

Me making a G chord on the guitar.
Simple G Chord

Now for the simple G chord. In order to play it, move your pinkie finger to the high E, third fret. Move your ring finger to the B string, third fret. These are the only fingers you will use for the simple G. See the photo below.

Simple G chord fingering.
D Chord

Now, let’s learn the D chord.

Move your middle finger to the high E, second fret. Move your index finger to the G string, second fret. Move your ring finger to the B string, third fret. See photo below.

Me demonstrating the D chord on guitar.

Now practice changing between the G and D chords for guitar. At first, you will be slow and you may have problems with your fingers touching other strings and muffling the sound. When this happens, try and position your fingers properly so they are not touching other strings to develop muscle memory for the right position. This may take you a while to get used to.

Remember, practice and determination are the keys to playing these chords well.

C Chord

There are three ways to play this chord. The easy way for people who cannot yet get their fingers to stretch all the way, including children, is the simple C.

  1. For the simple C chord, put your index finger on the B string, first fret. That is it.
  2. The second way to play the C chord is by putting your pinkie on the high E string, third fret. Put your ring finger on the B string, third fret. Put your middle finger on the A string, third fret. Put your index finger on the D string, second fret.
  3. To play the full C chord, put your ring finger on the A string, third fret. Put your pointer finger on the B string, first fret. Put your middle finger on the D string, second fret.
Ways To Make A C Chord
Simple C chord.
Full C chord.
Practice G, C, and D Chords

Now that you know three chords, practice your dexterity in switching between chords. See the video below.

E Minor Chord

To make the E minor chord, place your index finger on the A string, second fret. Place your middle finger on the D string, second fret. The photo for this is below.

E minor guitar chord.

Practice going back and forth between the different C and E minor chords. While the full C chord sounds best, you may find it easier to strum with one of the simplified chords.

F Chord

There is one F chord. To play it, put your index finger on both the B and high E strings together, first fret. Put your ring finger on the A string, third fret. Put your pinkie on the D string, third fret. Put your middle finger on the G string, second fret.

Simple C chord.
Second C chord.
Full C chord.
Practice G, C, and D Chords

Now that you know three chords, practice your dexterity in switching between chords. See the video below.

E Minor Chord

To make the E minor chord, place your index finger on the A string, second fret. Place your middle finger on the D string, second fret. The photo for this is below.

E minor guitar chord.

Practice going back and forth between the different C and E minor chords. While the full C chord sounds best, you may find it easier to strum with one of the simplified chords.

F Chord

There is one F chord. To play it, put your index finger on both the B and high E strings together, first fret. Put your ring finger on the A string, third fret. Put your pinkie on the D string, third fret. Put your middle finger on the G string, second fret.

How to play drum for beginner

1. Use a can of compressed air to get the dust out of those hard to reach places like in-between lugs and under the foot pedals of your drums.

2. Drum Teachers: Use flash cards as part of your drum lessons to help your students learn note values, dynamic markings, etc. You can make them yourself on 3 X 5 index cards.

3. Have a “Don’t Forget” list for all your instruments and related drum gear. Be sure to include such things as extra drum heads, drum sticks, mics and mic cables, metronome, duct tape, etc. This list will help you to never have one of those gut-wrenching moments when you realize you left something at home 2 hours away
4. Listen to “all” styles of music. This boosts your creativity on the drums and makes you more aware of how to approach these styles if you ever confront them in your band.

5. For dried up duct tape residue on your cymbals or drum stands, invest in a bottle of “Goo Gone”. This stuff is amazing (and even smells good!).

6. Teaching drums is an excellent motivator. You’ll learn a lot and your students will constantly keep you challenged during their lessons. When you’re able to articulate your point about any given subject, it’s then that you truly understand it. When you’re ready, consider offering drum lessons to beginner students. You’ll grow, learn, and get better at teaching. Good drum teachers are in demand!

7. Play “heel up” on the bass drum for more power and speed. The heel down bass drum technique will work but requires a bit more effort. Also, it’s easier to play heel up technique with quick drum fills

8. Books: There are many good drum method books that are not out in the limelight but are brilliantly written with top notch drum lessons. They may not be published through Warner Brothers or Hal Leonard, but the content is still top notch. Check out magazine reviews in drum publications, the web, etc. for independent book publishers.

9. Gaffers Tape: Ever hear people talk about “gaffers tape” and wonder what they’re referring to? Although it is similar to duct tape, gaffers tape leaves no residue on your drums, is a bit thicker and easier to tear. It’s also considerably more expensive.

10. The Library: Don’t forget your local Library as a rich resource of information about drums, drumset, and overall drumming and percussion (CDs, reference books, music history, etc.).

11. Soundproofing: To truly soundproof a drum room, you must create air channels between wall layering. We will be describing this in more detail later.

12. Warming up before a gig. This is terribly underestimated. Spend 20 to 30 minutes warming up withdrum rudiments and related sticking exercises. Practice them with music playing through a Walkman. It’s a great motivator and you’ll be very loose when you get ready to play.

13. Drum Set 101: It’s a bit of a misconception that you always need a drumset to work out drum licks or patterns. One can still have an effective practice by playing in the air (air drums) and/or tapping on their legs. The main idea is to go through the motions so you form some amount of muscle memory.

How to got talent in guitar

This post is for anyone who has thought about picking up the guitar but hasn’t yet. For those of you who aren’t musicians, becoming one is both more fun and easier than you imagine. I’m writing this post in the hopes that I can convince 1 or 2 of you to pick up a guitar and start making your own music. Below I describe a basic theory and method for getting started with the guitar that I’ve taught in real life to many friends with success.

Before I picked up the guitar, I was operating under a lot of false assumptions about how difficult it is to become a musician.

  1. I believed I was too old to start to learn music.
  2. I believed I had no musical talent and that I wasn’t a “musical” person.
  3. I thought you needed to learn to read music to play an instrument.
  4. I believed to overcome these barriers it would take too much time and effort.

I couldn’t have been more wrong on all these assumptions.

If you don’t have musical talent I’ve got good news for you– you don’t need it.

You just need time. Playing guitar is fundamentally about teaching your fingers to do weird things they aren’t used to doing. That’s it. It doesn’t take a genius. It takes some hours. Set aside 10 hours with the guitar and you’ll be playing some great songs. Promise.

I love playing the guitar. When I think of the decisions I’ve made that have changed my life the most, picking up the guitar was one of the most important and meaningful decisions I’ve ever made.

Learning how to play an instrument opens tons of doors:

  1. A quality and productive way to “unplug” and relax.
  2. You’ll enter in to a community of musicians who are looking to jam, sing, write, and take over the world– it’s like learning a new language and culture.
  3. No matter what your race, sex, creed or color you will increase your sexual attractiveness.
  4. Listening to music will become more enjoyable because you’ll start to pull apart the composition– you’ll begin to understand what is going on. (Eventually you’ll start to make your own).
  5. And as a bonus… once you learn your first instrument, the next ones get easier.

This post will teach you how to play songs on the guitar in less than 10 hours.

The information you need to play the guitar can be learned in 5-10 minutes. That information consists of 5 finger shapes you must remember. I’ve posted them below. The rest of your 10 hours will be spent teaching your finger muscles to play chord shapes.